Tagged with thriller

Put Out the Light (1931) by Ethel Lina White

Book Review by Sylvia D: This is one of the earlier published works of Ethel Lina White (1876-1944). I found it rather strange, albeit intriguing. It was a disturbing rather than enjoyable read. I think this unease arises from the nature of the main character, who is relentlessly horrible. She is Miss Anthea Vina who … Continue reading

The Toll-Gate (1955) by Georgette Heyer

Book Review by George S.: I’ve read reviews on the internet complaining that The Toll-Gate is not a proper ‘Regency Romance’ in the usual Georgette Heyer manner. It isn’t. It’s more of a comedy-thriller romp set in the past – and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The hero is Jack Staple, a huge man, a Captain … Continue reading

An Eye for a Tooth (1943) – Dornford Yates

Book review by George S: This is one of Dornford Yates’s Chandos series of thrillers. The cover of the first edition makes that very clear. It pictures a mediaeval-looking street (which does not correspond to any location in the novel) hung with signs advertising the previous thrillers in the series. It’s an odd cover – … Continue reading

The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932) by Sax Rohmer

Book Review by George S: In 1936, fifteen-year old Mary Wilkinson began to keep a record of her reading, and continued it for several years. This month members of the Reading Group have been reading some of the books a young woman read in the late thirties and early forties. The Mask of Fu Manchu … Continue reading

Stamboul Train (1932) by Graham Greene

By JN The Orient Express, a fascinating machine transporting people from different walks of life across Europe in a web of murder, lies and love. That’s the image that Graham Greene establishes in his gripping page-turner ‘Stamboul Train.’ This cemented his reputation as ‘one of the most important British writers of the twentieth century.’ (Daily … Continue reading

1944 (1926) by the Earl of Halsbury

Book review by George S: The Earl of Halsbury’s novel, 1944 (published in 1926) is a very readable example of the ‘Future War’ genre’. Before 1914, such books had mostly been grim warnings about possible German invasions. After 1918,  they still proliferated, though with a change of emphasis. My favourites are the ones where Bolshevik … Continue reading