Tagged with political fiction

Love on the Dole by Walter Greenwood (1933)

Book review by Chris Hopkins. Having now posted blogs about most of Walter Greenwood’s fiction, I realise that these pretty much all refer back to his first novel, Love on the Dole (1933), so for the sake of completeness and to help the blog reader, I ought to add a blog for that first novel. … Continue reading

The Secret Kingdom (1938) by Walter Greenwood

Book review by Chris Hopkins. Walter Greenwood’s father was a hairdresser and by the time he married Elizabeth Matilda Walter he had opened his own hairdresser’s shop (‘Tom’s Hairdressing Saloon’) at 56 Ellor Street, Salford (the premises are pictured in the frontispiece to Greenwood’s memoir, There Was A Time, 1967 and also on the Salford University … Continue reading

1944 (1926) by the Earl of Halsbury

Book review by George S: The Earl of Halsbury’s novel, 1944 (published in 1926) is a very readable example of the ‘Future War’ genre’. Before 1914, such books had mostly been grim warnings about possible German invasions. After 1918,  they still proliferated, though with a change of emphasis. My favourites are the ones where Bolshevik … Continue reading

Cloudless May (1943) by Storm Jameson

Review by Sylvia D For our women writers and World Wars One and Two session I read Storm Jameson’s Cloudless May (Macmillan, 1943 and still in print) which is a political and psychological exploration of the fall of France in the Second World War. The writing reveals a considerable knowledge of French landscape, culture and … Continue reading

National Provincial by Lettice Cooper (1938)

Review by George Simmers This is a very good example of the middlebrow political novel. Lettice Cooper was a committed socialist, and in part is preaching the need for social change, but she follows many other novelists of the period in positioning herself as the voice of common sense, against all extremes (the way of … Continue reading

The Stars Look Down by A J Cronin (1935)

Review by Helen N: This book if expressed simplistically might be expressed in the words of the old Music Hall song – It’s the same the whole world over… It’s the Poor what gets the blame but it is much more than this. It lays bare the poverty and danger of the lives of miners … Continue reading

Fame is the Spur by Howard Spring (1940)

Review by George Simmers. See his Great War Fiction blog (with other posts on Howard Spring) here. This is a very readable, extremely absorbing, epic of the career of a Labour politician, tracing his life from childhood poverty to the House of Lords. It can be taken as strong’s version of the idealistic rise, and … Continue reading